Simple Ceviche Recipes

Photo By: Matt Armendariz

Photo By: Con Poulos©2010

Photo By: The Youngrens©Copyright: 2011 The Youngrens, Inc





Photo By: Matt Armendariz©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved


Tilapia Ceviche

This 5-star recipe is sure to become your new go-to. Reviewers rave that it’s “so easy to make”, “fresh and delicious” and “a hit” with family and friends. The key is to make sure that all the ingredients are finely diced. Marcela’s trick for cutting the fish? Pop it in the freezer for a few minutes so that it’s partially frozen — it will be much easier to cut into small pieces.

Get the Recipe:Tilapia Ceviche

Scallop Ceviche

When you’re making ceviche, quality is key. You’re only using a handful of ingredients so be sure to buy the freshest and best available. If possible, buy your scallops the same day you plan to make the ceviche. Here, we pair bay scallops with jalapeno and lime juice for the a sweet, spicy and refreshing dish that lets the seafood take center stage.

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Shrimp Ceviche

The secret to perfectly tender shrimp ceviche is to set a timer. It takes 15 minutes to “cook” the shrimp in the lime juice. If you leave it longer than that, it will start to get chewy.

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Bay Scallop Ceviche

The key to great ceviche? Keep it simple. We marinate sweet bay scallops in fresh lime juice until they’re opaque and “cooked” through before adding just a handful of other ingredients — like green olive for saltiness, tomatoes for freshness and jalapeno for spiciness.

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Cebiche Carretillero

Peru is the birthplace of cebiche, a dish of acid-cooked seafood that is all about freshness. This version is popular in Lima; the term ”carretillero” means that it is served from a street cart. The crunchiness and temperature of the warm fried octopus provides a nice contrast to the cold fish. Peruvians call the tangy liquid the fish has soaked in ”leche de tigre” (tiger’s milk) and consider it an aphrodisiac and hangover cure; when you are done eating the fish, pick up your bowl or plate and drink it.

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Scallop Ceviche with Candied Citrus

This clever recipe uses the time while the scallops are marinating in the citrus juice to make candied orange and lime peel. The colorful bits of citrus not only look pretty — they add a little bit of sweetness to balance out the tart, refreshing flavors of the dish.

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Mango Salmon Ceviche

When raw fish marinates in citrus or acid it starts to take on a beautifully bright flavor. In this recipe we use salmon and lime juice — and then finish the ceviche with mango, avocado and green apple for a refreshing and flavorful bite.

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Tomatillo Scallop Ceviche

Ceviche lets you make the most out of a small amount of luxe, super-fresh scallops. We think of the char on the tomatillos as in important ingredient: it adds a slight smokiness and sweetness all its own. To step up the spice, slice some small red chiles into rounds, and toss them (seeds and all) with the ceviche before chilling.

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Mahi Mahi Ceviche

Two simple steps, a handful of ingredients and just 10 minutes of active cooking time — that’s all it takes to create a restaurant-worthy ceviche. Trust us, the most difficult part of making this recipe is waiting for an hour before you can dig in!

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Bay Scallop Ceviche

Ina’s take on ceviche? She “cooks” bay scallops (which are smaller and sweeter than sea scallops) in lime juice before tossing them with a mix of fresh veggies, jalapeno and parsley. When it’s time to serve the ceviche, she skips the crisp tortillas, opting for buttery Bibb lettuce cups instead. How refreshing!

Get the Recipe:Bay Scallop Ceviche

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